Pondering the American League

Rockies vs. Cardinals, Coors Field

Pat

So I’ve finished picking my favorites in the National League for the upcoming 2014 season. Now it’s time to pick the American League. As I study the depth charts for AL teams, I find that I don’t know these players as well as I know the NL players. Why is this? Well, I am a national league guy. I live in a national league city with the Colorado Rockies. I was raised in St. Louis and am still a huge Cardinal fan. But come on, I have the MLB package on Direct TV and I can watch any game I want and in fact every game if I want to. But I don’t watch much of the American League. Why is that, really?

I’ll tell you why. It’s not as good as national league baseball. There are fewer close games, and it’s way less strategic than an NL game, so it’s just less compelling to watch and follow. Why is that? The designated hitter. You know it’s cheating, right? They use ten players in a game instead of nine. I still can’t believe major league baseball allowed the American League change the rules just for their league. Can you imagine the AFC conference in the NFL wanting a more offensive conference by changing the rules to allow twelve players on offense just for the AFC? The NFL would never allow it. I still wonder what baseball was thinking when they allowed this happen. I read an article recently about how the NL should just go ahead and institute the DH. Man, I hope that never happens.

When my wife and I are at a Rockies game or watching a game on TV, we discuss strategy all the time. So you think they will bunt in this situation? How about a suicide squeeze to take the lead here or should they go for the big inning? With a change to break the game open, should they pinch hit for the pitcher or keep him in the game since he’s still pitching well? These are all decisions the AL manager does not have to think about. They are important managerial decisions that can change the game in the NL, making the NL game a lot more fun to watch.

I snuck onto my soap box, and here I go again. I don’t think the AL will ever get rid of the DH, but it is my sincere hope that the NL never adopts this rule. The DH makes baseball a worse game in my humble opinion. I will never watch as many AL games as I do the NL because it’s just not as compelling to me. But, next blog I will go ahead and make my AL picks for the 2014 season.  I just won’t care quite as much.

Masha

I too was raised a National League fan. I too hate the DH, but for slightly different reasons than Pat, or maybe additional reasons. My problem with the DH, and the reason that many of my friends love the DH is because it reduces baseball to hitting. Only hitting. Big home runs, big hitters, big bats. You score more than the other team and you win. Yes, that’s the basis for baseball, but not the only compelling thing about it. And hitting the white ball is not the only thing going on in a major league baseball game, or shouldn’t be.

I love a pitcher’s duel. There is greatness in the crafty left-hander fooling a big hitter. Some of the best baseball games I’ve ever attended have been 1-0 games, with two amazing pitchers on the mound doing a great job. The games also went quickly (one of the arguments for the DH I’ve heard), and no one threw over 100 pitches. But in the NL, the pitcher has to be more than just the guy throwing the ball. He has to be able to make contact, even if it’s just a bunt. The teams that do well in the NL have great hitting pitchers. Hang on here, *sigh*, this is just going to feed into Pat’s baseball ego, but the Cardinals are one of those teams and their record shows it. If your pitcher can hit reasonably well in addition to pitching a great game, the game takes on an additional layer of strategy. Do I leave this guy in because he’s batting .278, better than the pinch-hitter I might slot in for him, even though he’s got 98 pitches?

Fans of the DH will argue that it’s the very rare pitcher who can hit well and that a pitcher is usually a guaranteed out. As a baseball fan, I’ve seen pitchers surprise everyone, including himself, by getting a seeing-eye single when the team needed it most. And that moment of surprise is worth more than 3 homeruns to me.

So take your big hitters, American League, and leave me to my hitting pitchers. I prefer strategizing whether I should bunt here, or wondering why my manager is leaving this pitcher in, to watching a small white ball sail over a fence. It’s just more interesting to me.

Rashard Mendenhall – A Fond Farewell

Masha

Rashard Mendenhall announced his retirement yesterday. Among the free agents that would have been very popular in today’s free agency, Rashard has made an impact for both the Steelers and the Cardinals. He has a Super Bowl ring from Super Bowl XLIII. His college career was stellar. And now he’s retiring at 26 yeas old.

ESPN’s football experts have expressed shock that a 26-year-old would retire. Twitter went crazy. And I’m blogging about it. And I think I’m one of the few that admires Rashard’s decision. I’ve linked his announcement so you can read for yourselves, but I think Rashard is retiring for all the right reasons.

He’s accomplished everything anyone could dream of in football, including the difficult-to-attain Super Bowl ring. He’s a talented writer who has filled his life with other interests, along with football. He’s now following a dream of his to become a writer. Good for him, he’s following the advice of every business person on the speaker’s tour – do what you love and you’ll love what you do. He doesn’t love football anymore, he likes it. It sounds like he’s always “liked” football. But he loves writing. He’s going to write.

So bravo to Rashard for deciding to follow his heart. May we all be so lucky.

“Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.” — Confucius

Rashard Mendenhall retirement announcement

Pre-season predictions 3

Pat

And finally, we have the NL East. This one is a tough pick. The Braves took the division without any challenge at all last year. I don’t think that will happen this year. In fact, I am going to pick the Washington Nationals to win this division. Injuries killed the Nats last year and just looking at the depth chart, I feel they have a better starting pitching rotation and the bull pens about even. I also think that the Nats’ offense is stronger than the Braves this year. So I do think that the Braves will take second and contend for a wild card birth. That puts Arizona, Pittsburgh, and Atlanta challenging for 2 wild card slots.

I think the Phillies will play a little bit better than they did last year, but only good enough for third place in the East. They need to stay healthy and pitch way better than they did last year. That puts the Mets in fourth place in the division although I do see improvements with them. Not quite ready to contend, but they seem to be heading in the right direction.  Obviously the Marlins are bringing up the rear, as they were last year. I can’t quite see what direction the Marlins are going; we’ll have to see how well their young players perform this year.

So to recap the National League. I have the Cardinals, Dodgers, and Nationals winning the divisions. The Pirates, Diamondbacks and Braves will contend for the two wild card spots.  It’s always fun to see how many I get right. It’s hard to pick this early, but it’s also a fun exercise.

Win one for the Gipper – Happy Birthday Knute Rockne

Knute Rockne, photo courtesy of the University of Notre Dame.

Knute Rockne, photo courtesy of the University of Notre Dame.

Happy Birthday Knute Rockne. Born in 1888, Rockne played and coached for the University of Notre Dame, popularizing the forward pass and creating a football powerhouse in the process.

He was known for his inspirational locker room speeches, including a speech in 1928 quoting the 1920 death-bed words of one of his players, George “Gipper” Gipp:  “I’ve got to go, Rock. It’s all right. I’m not afraid. Some time, Rock, when the team is up against it, when things are going wrong and the breaks are beating the boys, tell them to go in there with all they’ve got and win just one for the Gipper. I don’t know where I’ll be then, Rock. But I’ll know about it, and I’ll be happy.” The “Fighting Irish” team was losing to Army, 6-0, at the end of the half, Rockne gave this speech at half time. It inspired the team, who then outscored Army in the second half and won the game, 12-6.